Science

Key Stage 4: Why study GCSE Science/Additional Science?

The government expects that the large majority of students will study at least two Science GCSEs. This means that Clifton students will study one of the following:

–           GCSE Core Science.

–           GCSE Additional Science

Our most able students can also opt to study the separate sciences (GCSE Biology, GCSE Chemistry, GCSE Physics).

What will I study?

In all of the courses you will study a balanced curriculum of Biology, Chemistry and Physics. All of the key ideas and concepts in these subjects are covered; the depth of study will depend on the tier of course taken. The material will be taught 3 weekly lessons of 80 minutes. This gives each student 4 hours of science per

What happens in lessons?

Students will experience a range of learning activities (project based learning, independent research etc.) that will be tailored to suit their needs. A significant portion of the course will involve practical work that helps develop students’ conceptual understanding. Students will use an objective but critical approach to solve problems and uncover some of the fundamental scientific ideas that affect the world.

How will I be assessed?

Core Science –

Formal assessment will comprise of three Module 1 exams in the summer term of Y10 (one Physics, one Chemistry and one Biology) each contributing to 25% of the final grade. There will also be a Controlled Assessment Unit (CAU) contributing the final 25%.

Formal assessment will comprise of three Module 2 exams in the summer term of Y11 (one Physics, one Chemistry and one Biology) each contributing to 25% of the final grade. There will also be a Controlled Assessment Unit contributing the final 25%.

What skills will I need?

To succeed in all scientific disciplines offered at Clifton, it is essential for the student to show a deep interest in the world around them and a desire to understand it. They will understand the need to develop their practical skills so that they can collect precise data through the use of a range of measurement techniques that helps the formation of valid ideas and informs their judgements.

Key Stage 4: Why study Triple Science (GCSE Biology, GCSE Chemistry, GCSE Physics)?

All of the science courses allow progression onto KS5 courses. However, different courses allow access to different KS5 courses. The separate sciences are the best choice for students who are seriously considering studying two of more science subjects at KS5. Separate Science is for students interested in science and who want to have more time to study it in more depth. Whilst this is a very demanding course academically, it does prepare students very well for post-16 studies and beyond.

What will I study?

In all of the courses you will study a balanced curriculum within each discipline of Biology, Chemistry and Physics. All of the key ideas and concepts in these subjects are covered in a greater depth than in core and additional science. This is essential in order to prepare the students for further study at KS5 and beyond.. The material will be taught in 5 lessons of 80 minutes per week. This gives each student almost 6.5 hours of science per week.

The table below lists to topics taught in each of the science disciplines throughout KS4.

Biology Chemistry Physics
Unit 1: Biology 1 Unit 1: Chemistry 1 Unit 1: Physics 1
B1.1 Keeping healthy C1.1 The fundamental ideas in chemistry P1.1 The transfer of energy by heating processes and the factors that affect the rate at which

that energy is transferred

B1.2 Nerves and hormones C1.2 Limestone and building materials P1.2 Energy and efficiency
B1.3 The use and abuse of drugs C1.3 Metals and their uses P1.3 The usefulness of electrical appliances
B1.4 Interdependence and adaptation C1.4 Crude oil and fuels P1.4 Methods we use to generate electricity
B1.5 Energy and biomass in food chains C1.5 Other useful substances from crude oil P1.5 The use of waves for communication and to provide evidence that the universe is

expanding

B1.6 Waste materials from plants and animals C1.6 Plant oils and their uses
B1.7 Genetic variation and its control C1.7 Changes in the Earth and its atmosphere
B1.8 Evolution
Unit 2: Biology 2 Unit 2: Chemistry 2 Unit 2: Physics 2
B2.1 Cells and simple cell transport C2.1 Structure and bonding P2.1 Forces and their effects
B2.2 Tissues, organs and organ systems C2.2 How structure influences the properties and uses of substances P2.2 The kinetic energy of objects speeding up or slowing down
B2.3 Photosynthesis C2.3 Atomic structure, analysis and quantitative chemistry P2.3 Currents in electrical circuits
B2.4 Organisms and their environment C2.4 Rates of reaction P2.4 Using mains electricity safely and the power of electrical appliances
B2.5 Proteins – their functions and uses C2.5 Exothermic and endothermic reactions P2.5 What happens when radioactive substances decay, and the uses and dangers of their

emissions

B2.6 Aerobic and anaerobic respiration C2.6 Acids, bases and salts P2.6 Nuclear fission and nuclear fusion
B2.7 Cell division and inheritance C2.7 Electrolysis
B2.8 Speciation
Unit 3: Biology 3 Unit 3: Chemistry 3 Unit 3: Physics 3
B3.1 Movement of molecules in and out of cells C3.1 The periodic table P3.1 Medical applications of physics
B3.2 Transport systems in plants and animals C3.2 Water P3.2 Using physics to make things work
B3.3 Homeostasis C3.3 Calculating and explaining energy change P3.3 Keeping things moving
B3.4 Humans and their environment C3.4 Further analysis and quantitative chemistry
C3.5 The production of ammonia
C3.6 Alcohols, carboxylic acids and esters

What happens in lessons?

Students will experience a range of learning activities (project based learning, conduct independent research etc.) all tailored to suit their emerging needs. A significant portion of the course will involve practical work that helps develop students’ conceptual understanding. Students will use an objective but critical approach to solve problems and uncover some of the fundamental scientific ideas that affect the world.

How will I be assessed?

Formal assessment for each science will comprise of the following:

Unit 1: 1 hour written examination worth 25% of the total marks..

Unit 2: 1 hour written examination worth 25% of the total marks.

Unit 3: 1 hour written examination worth 25% of the total marks.

Unit 4: Controlled assessment practical investigative skills assessment (ISA) worth 25% of the total marks.

What skills will I need?

To succeed in all scientific disciplines offered at Clifton, it is essential for the student to show a deep interest in the world around them and a desire to understand, evaluate and explain it as fully as possible. Students will understand the need to develop their practical skills so that they can collect precise data through the use of a range of measurement techniques that helps the formation of valid ideas and informs their judgements.

You need to be good at maths and general science but enthusiasm about learning science is also very important.

An important skill required is the ability to work independently for substantial periods of time in order to supplement your classroom studies. Studying separate science requires a high level of commitment as there will be almost 6.5 hours of science lessons each week and the pace within these lessons is high due to the demand of the course and the time allocated to deliver the subject content.